Do we compete for the creative powers of the world? (that is: democratizing consciousness and why you should care)

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::Do we compete for the creative energies of re-imagining the world?::

The world is in dire need of a new imagination. Literally, we need to see things anew and re-imagine everything, because now more than any other time in recent history do we need to come up with solutions to some of our pressing problems that require leaps of creativity, boldness, and imagine-ation. This creativity though is hampered by some of the very structural causes of the problems we need to solve. Our institutions, structures, and social norms work on our cognition of our surrounding reality in such way that the world shows up as ‘finished’ to us: best we can do is to adapt and navigate our systems – much rarer are messages that ask us to truly re-think the pillars of our societal structures. By definition, though, the world is not completely ‘finished’ as there is also a part that is ‘unfinished’: there is an aspect of the world which is not given and that must be actualized by the individual free-willed initiative. Like a skilled poet who left his best artwork missing a final line -not that she overlook the finale, rather she is inviting you to co-create the end with your own creativity. Put it another way, we can consider the realms of freedom as outlined in these two territories. Everything which seems ‘finished’ can be seen as the realm of the constraints that we must deal with and creatively adapt to; this territory of the ‘finished’ in a dialectic dance outlines the rest that is out of it, which is the territory of the ‘unfinished’. Like an ever-changing shore line, the finished world draws the boundary of the unfinished: everything beyond that line is what is open for our creative power of imagination. The boundaries of our constraints delineate where our freedom begins. In this space of freedom comes the power of our consciousness to bring about genuine creativity into the world, to create things anew, to challenge the old structures by creating new ones or by assigning new meanings to the preformed, culturally given meanings we were taught. (I borrow this idea of finished vs unfinished from a beautiful book called The Metamorphosis of the Given).

::My thesis::
In this piece I argue that if any type of hegemony is creating divisions on the fundamental equality and oneness of the people of the world then this perception also influences the perceived access to the creative powers to re-imagine the world in novel ways, bringing into existence realities that were never seen before.

To explain this, let me go farther back. For the last few thousands of years as humankind we have been widely distributed into very diverse societies, tribes, ways to organize our lives as collectives of people, and most often different groups have been in competition over political, military, and economic supremacy. We have seen throughout history how when a group dominates over another a type of cultural hegemony takes place.

Fast forward until some two centuries ago. Marx and Engels in The Capital postulate that a minority of people was oppressing a majority by possession of capital and profiting over the hard work of the “proletariat” (the working class). By the virtue of these imbalances, a very unequal and unjust societal system was in place and class warfare was all about re-balancing that and achieving a supremacy of the working class via radical redistribution of wealth.
The current economic systems appears to be built in such a way that allows only to a limited number of people to have a greater freedom to pursue their passions, aspirations, and to use their most creative energies. Imagine for a moment to plot Maslow’s pyramid of human needs on a chart and to write beside the different levels of such a pyramid what would be the corresponding jobs linked to such satisfaction of needs in the global economy. What jobs satisfy the needs at each of the levels? Now I wish to invite you to accept two ideas as working premises for this argument:
1) The economic system is shifting and more and more people in ‘privileged’ economies are using the freedom to pursue jobs and careers that satisfy their deepest aspirations and unlock their creativity;
2) The current economic system is built in a way that allows only to certain people such freedom to unlock their creative energies. A lot of others are either dealing with more pressing needs or forced to contribute to the world economy’s equivalent of the Maslow pyramid by necessity, forced by economic structures that shape the world today.
A person’s creative work is still relying on a ton of less exciting jobs which lay out the structural conditions upon which that one job was made possible.

Now, whether it was distribution of wealth, military oppression, or market forces creating divisions between nations or within societies, my argument is that these hegemonies have also affected the redistribution of the creative energies to redesign the world. When you look at any type of cultural supremacy, it is first and foremost a domination of the imagination, of language, of cultural identity, which affects both the perception of the ‘given’ and the feeling of entitlement for bringing about the ‘not given’ into the world. I have recently visited a few countries in Africa and was quite amazed at how much the education system in countries like Zimbabwe and Uganda is still shaped by the British blueprint. There are systems that culturally shape us which can give a biased perception of who we are as a people and may re-define our history (think about how many movies people the world over watch every day and get shaped in their worldview by how Hollywood sees the world). Historical footprints are another example that comes in handy. Some nations are still constructing their identity as a young independent country and thus need to find their rightful place in the world, also in terms of what unique gifts they can bring. But when the people of a nation have been oppressed for years, or centuries, this history affects their self-perception when we come together to re-imagine our common destiny as a human species. If people have been serving a king for centuries, have not possessed their own land, and have been told to shut up for too long, they have learned a different narrative about a man’s life purpose, what is happiness, what can a man contribute to change his society. It is likely that such a legacy of being dominated has shaped a worldview influenced by fatalism and historic determinism (narratives such as: ‘things are never going to change’, ‘society changes by forces beyond my control’, etc.)
And by analogy you could extend this reasoning to a large number of situations. Countries, ethnic groups, have been competing for power and maybe this has affected the creative powers as well.
It has long been held -and more philosophy is shifting towards this tenet- that our consciousness creates reality. (Building on this book by the late Willis Harman, I outline some examples of such a shift in thinking). After studying the human brain for decades, Nobel laureate Roger Sperry argued that one of the fundamental flaws in our scientific thinking was the dismissal of consciousness as a causal reality. In its easiest expressions, we can see how thought generates action, how a vision, a dream, an aspiration takes place in the world of our imagination before being manifested in the external reality. I believe that this has always been true, but it is only recently that we are becoming aware of the processes by which we make our imagination and our consciousness work to create our reality.
If (better say when) humankind wakes up to this realization, a few exciting things will happen -and some of them are surfacing already now in the global dialogue.
– People who have been oppressed by a perception of unfair treatments will realize their immense power. Whether it is market injustice, unfair wealth distribution, oppression from a totalitarian regime, people will realize that any of such systems, even the most despicable and unbearable ones, are resting upon a sense of legitimacy given by the oppressed. This legitimacy is resting in a thought, and consciousness can change thought at thought-speed. One day a million people wake up and say “we don’t agree to be oppressed anymore”. The source of revolutions resides in the human mind for it is just a thought – and regimes have understood that and try and control that thought more than anything else.
– The source of authority will progressively shift from external to internal. Obedience will carry a newer meaning as obedience to inner truth much more than obedience to any external authority.

To wrap it up, if it is indeed true that we might be competing for these creative powers, it is important for me to open up that conversation. If we are indeed shifting towards the realization that our consciousness creates reality, then this may be an incredibly important factor that can empower people in shaping their destiny -as individuals, and as collectives. I deeply care about these creative forces to shape the world being democratized as much as possible. Would this enlightenment be only a matter for a handful of white men who could take a year off, travel to India, go to spiritual retreats, and the like? While a lot of people are still working from a worldview that doesn’t allow them to recognize that they have the power to change their life conditions for the better? It is a bleak scenario in which this disparity would only create another form of supremacy, equally detestable.
It is my wish that these creative powers, that this awareness and recognition of our most precious sources of creativity, be democratized and made accessible to all, for the benefit of a real re-distribution of our true wealth which begins from a democracy of access to our consciousness and its powers.

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